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Author: Hannah Tyson

Icons of American Music

  • Macon

    In Macon, embrace the birthplace of Southern rock with a visit to the legendary Capricorn Sound Studios and Museum. This sacred space, where musical pioneers crafted timeless tunes, welcomes visitors to explore its preserved Studio A, museum, and additional studio at Mercer Music at Capricorn. Bands like the Allman Brothers, Wet Willie, Marshall Tucker, and Lynyrd Skynyrd found their voice within these walls during the early 1970s, leaving a lasting mark on music history.

    Journey to Rose Hill Cemetery in Macon, a sprawling 50-acre canvas woven with history, art, and the timeless tales of Macon. Established in 1840, this serene sanctuary was the brainchild of Simri Rose, a horticulturist integral to Macon’s city planning. Duane, Gregg, Butch Trucks, and Berry Oakley, the pioneers of rock, now rest within these hallowed grounds.

  • Athens

    Immerse yourself in Athens’ rich musical heritage with a leisurely stroll along the Athens Music Walk of Fame. This enchanting trail guides visitors through the town’s profound influence on music, passing by renowned music venues like the iconic Georgia Theatre and the legendary 40 Watt Club, alongside inductees such as the B-52s and R.E.M. From soulful blues to rhythmic hip-hop, and even echoes of Broadway greatness, the Walk of Fame encapsulates the diverse musical legacy of Athens. For an in-depth exploration, groups can arrange guided tours through the Athens Welcome Center. Dive into the stories behind the music, tracing the evolution of Athens’ vibrant soundscapes.

    Central to Athens’ musical scene, the Georgia Theatre stands as a living testament to the town’s enduring love affair with music. Originally built in 1935 as the Elite Theater, it showcased a diverse array of acts on their journey to stardom. After a devastating fire in 2009, the Georgia Theatre was reopened in 2011 and again plays host to acclaimed bands that appeal to fans from all age groups and music genres.

  • Madison

    In Madison, Heritage Hall unfolds a surprising musical connection to the Allman Brothers’ song “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed.” This historic house museum invites you to explore the intertwining threads of history, inspiration and music. Take time to come immerse yourself in the tales that echo through its halls.

  • Old Clinton/Gray

    In Old Clinton/Gray, the Otis Redding Memorial stands as a timeless tribute to “The King of Soul.” Otis Redding’s journey from a rhythm and blues artist to a posthumous superstar is etched in the melodies of “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay,” a chart-topping hit born from tragedy.

    While Macon is commonly linked to Redding, Old Clinton/Gray held a special place in his heart, as shared by his daughter. In September 2015, she unveiled a musical monument that goes beyond a mere marker. Crafted to resemble a seven-foot-square album cover, this landmark invites you to touch the soul of Otis Redding. Turn the pages of his legacy through an interactive panel on the backside, playing six of his iconic songs. It’s not just a memorial; it’s a harmonious connection to the roots of a musical legend, allowing you to experience the soulful magic that defined Otis Redding’s legacy.

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A large, historic accommodation in the form of a white two-story house with a red roof is surrounded by lush greenery. The house features tall columns, a grand entrance with steps leading up to it, and multiple windows. The front yard includes manicured lawns, bushes, and trees.

Historic Accommodations

Macon

  • 1842 Inn

    At 1842 Inn spend the night in a historic cottage or room within an impressive Greek revival architectural home. Enjoy iced tea under the wrap-around veranda or in the courtyard. There are nineteen room offerings with nine being found in the Victorian Cottage found behind the main historic structure.

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  • Burke Mansion

    Experience Burke Mansion, which was built in 1887 by T.C. Burke, who was known as the “Merchant Prince” of Macon. It is said to be one of the finest examples of Queen Anne Victorian Architecture in the country and is the only lodging in Macon listed on The National Historic Register! Find four rooms in the main home or if you are looking for a more private stay, you can stay in the Fulbright Cottage also found on the property. 

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  • Hotel Forty Five

    Hotel Forty Five has the best of both worlds: A historic structure that has been revitalized and also features decor that pays homage to Macon’s musical heritage while still having many modern amenities like a gym, chef-driven restaurant, rooftop bar and coffee shop. The structure was built in 1920 and was the home of the county’s William C Hill Annex office and also was considered the tallest building from New York to Miami at the time. Now it’s home to an art-deco style boutique hotel that is quickly becoming a top pick for those looking to stay downtown!

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Athens

  • The Colonels B&B

    The Colonels Bed and Breakfast is in a columned Greek Revival rural mansion, originally established in 1860. The proprietors have furnished the mansion with European antiques imported from an old chateau. The estate is located on 30 pastoral acres and is less than a 15 minute drive to downtown Athens. The bed and breakfast features seven bedrooms, two antique breakfast rooms, four porches and patios, traditional individually cooked breakfast, fishing pond, horses, nature preserve along the Rock and Shoals outcrop area.

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  • ATH|BNB The Rushmore

    This stately home was built in 1918 and was the Cobb family residence for decades before becoming a fraternity house. Now a luxurious bed and breakfast, the owners worked closely with the Athens Historic Preservation Commission to make sure their concept retained the feel of a family home. ATH|BNB: The Rushmore has fourteen modern suites in the heart and soul of the historic Victorian-era Five Points neighborhood and the S. Milledge Ave. historic district. The original hardwood floors, brick exterior and most of the windows of the house were preserved.

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  • Hotel Abacus & The Foundry

    This boutique hotel utilizes several of Athens’ most historic buildings. The Hoyt House (1829) is one of the oldest buildings in Athens and now houses stately guest suites. The Foundry, where blacksmiths crafted famed works like the UGA Arch and the Double-Barreled Cannon, is now a restaurant and music venue. The Foundry was originally incorporated in 1850, burned down in 1853 and returned to operation again in 1854. This reimagined space honors the site’s roots and preserves a piece of Athens’ historic past, right in downtown Athens.

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Madison

  • The Brady Inn

    Brady Inn welcomes visitors to stay at this cozy Victorian Cottage built in 1885. Located on North Second Street in the heart of Madison’s historic district, this street was such an integral part of the civic and social life of the City of Madison that it was affectionately called “Gossip Alley” for most of the twentieth century. This historically women-owned Inn has seven bedrooms, heart pine floors and is filled with Victorian antiques. 

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  • Cedar Lane Farmstay

    Cedar Lane Farmstay, originally built in the 1830s by Henry Hilsabeck, was faithfully restored to preserve the home’s historic character. The restoration work has earned multiple accolades including an award for excellence by the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation, a listing on the National Register for Historic places, and was highlighted in national architectural books and magazines. Set on 160 acres of formal gardens, sweeping lawns and woodland paths to explore, birdwatch or experience the diverse wildlife, guests have a unique opportunity to stay in what resembles a living history museum. Authentically decorated with historic antiques, artwork and rugs, Cedar Lane Farmstay achieves a historic ambiance while still providing all the modern benefits today’s travelers desire including a fully equipped kitchen, luxury bedding and full bathrooms.

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  • Camp Hard Labor Creek State Park

    In 1934, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and the U.S. Forestry Service worked together to reforest over 5,000-acres of overworked farmland, establishing a National Park. The CCC planted 850,000 trees, constructed two lakes, and built many of the park’s original structures in Camp Rutledge and Camp Daniel Morgan. Now home to the only surviving CCC camp in Georgia, these original structures and the entire group camp are available for guests to rent. Hard Labor Creek was a National Park from 1939 to 1946 then transitioned to a State Park. Currently Georgia’s second largest State Park, Hard Labor Creek State Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Beyond the historic group lodgings, tent and RV campsites as well as modern cabins are available to book.

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Milledgeville

  • The Inn on North Jefferson

    The Inn on North Jefferson, a newly renovated historic gem built in 1820, offers luxurious overnight accommodations with five grand rooms, three of which are currently available, boasting incredible amenities and a prime location within walking distance of downtown shops and restaurants. Purchased and transformed by Cliff and Jen Charnes, owners of Local Yolkal in Downtown Milledgeville, the 6,000 square foot home features Victorian bay windows, a relaxing patio with fans, a pool, multiple fireplaces, and spacious communal areas, providing guests with a historic yet comfortable experience. Originally designed by Josiah Doles as a Piedmont plain house, the property has seen ownership by historical figures

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  • Rockwell House

    The Rockwell House, a grand Georgian mansion constructed in 1838 and once home to a former Georgia governor, is now welcoming overnight guests after a meticulous restoration project. With four luxurious guest suites, peaceful porches overlooking the grounds, and a newly renovated dream kitchen, the Rockwell House offers a memorable stay in Milledgeville, Georgia, blending historic charm with modern comfort for an unforgettable experience.

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  • 1930s Cottage in Downtown Milledgeville

    Experience the charm of downtown Milledgeville in this fully renovated 1930s brick cottage, conveniently located within walking distance to GCSU and Georgia Military College. With three bedrooms, two bathrooms, spacious living areas, and a fully stocked kitchen, guests can relax and unwind while enjoying the historic features and modern amenities of this centrally located home.

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Old Clinton/Gray

Jarrell 1920 House

The Jarrell 1920 House was part of the original Jarrell family farm, now known as Jarrell Plantation State Historic Site and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The 5,000 square-foot house has been preserved in its original condition. Interior walls and ceilings are of beautiful heart pine — from trees felled on Jarrell land, sawn to size on the Jarrell sawmill, and assembled by Jarrell hands. Most of the 19th and early 20th century furniture is still preserved in its original state.

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Eatonton

Dot 2 Dot Inn

Dot2Dot Inn, a distinctive bed and breakfast nestled in the historic town of Eatonton, Georgia, offers a unique blend of Antebellum history and modern charm. With three luxurious rooms, indulgent Cordon Bleu gourmet breakfasts, and personalized service, this cozy retreat is a true gem. Immerse yourself in the experience of residing in an Antebellum home, reveling in its spacious tranquility, and savoring a delectable gourmet breakfast. In addition to the regular offerings, Dot2Dot Inn occasionally hosts special community events such as pre-theater dinners, Sunday Brunch, Friday Take-Out, and English Tea. Dot2Dot Inn is also an ideal venue for intimate private events and weddings, with the added convenience of on/off site catering services.

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Architectural Landmarks

  • Milledgeville

    Constructed in 1839, the Old Governor’s Mansion in Milledgeville is a remarkable example of High Greek Revival architecture, designed by Charles Cluskey and built by Timothy Porter. Over thirty years, it housed Georgia’s leaders like George Crawford and Howell Cobb, playing a vital role in the state’s history during the antebellum, Civil War, and early Reconstruction periods, addressing complex social issues such as slavery, societal dynamics, and gender roles. It served as the headquarters claimed as a prize during General William T. Sherman’s “March to the Sea” in 1864. Later becoming Georgia College’s founding building in 1889, the Mansion is now a National Historic Landmark and a Smithsonian Institution affiliate, welcoming the public for ADA-compliant tours with varying admission rates.

  • Macon

    In the city of Macon, the landscape whispers secrets of ancient civilizations, and at its heart lies the awe-inspiring Ocmulgee Mounds National Historical Park—an architectural marvel that transcends time. This sacred site, cradled by the Ocmulgee River, bears witness to the profound cultural significance of the indigenous people who once called these lands home. The region along the Ocmulgee River once flourished with around 60 villages, forming the vibrant Muscogee (Creek) Nation in the 18th century. However, the passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830 led to the forced relocation of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation to Oklahoma in 1836. Today the city of Macon, and the Muscogee (Creek) Nation are working together to tell the history and culture of the area accurately and respectfully.

    Visitors can traverse 8 miles of trails that wind through lush forests, wetlands, and wildlife habitats, offering a serene communion with nature. Delve into the park’s visitor center, where the cultural tapestry of the region unfolds through exhibits and artifacts recovered from millennia past. In every step through Ocmulgee Mounds, you are not just exploring a historical site; you are walking in the footsteps of ancient civilizations, learning from their stories, and witnessing a unique collaboration between history and the present moment.

  • Oconee County

    Eagle Tavern, a charming relic of the past, stands as a testament to Oconee County’s rich history and hospitality. Originally constructed in 1801, this venerable establishment once served as a stagecoach stop, welcoming weary travelers on their journey through the heart of Georgia. The tavern’s colonial architecture and quaint charm transport visitors to a bygone era, allowing them to imagine the lively comings and goings of the early 19th century.

    The William Daniell House, standing as one of Oconee County’s oldest architectural treasures, bears witness to both its historical significance and its deep-rooted ties to the region’s agricultural heritage. Constructed in 1814, this two-story, wood-framed house served as the focal point of an active agricultural property, embodying the plantation plain architectural style prevalent during that era. With a side-gabled roof, exterior end chimneys, and a rear one-story shed, the house exudes the charm of early 19th-century rural architecture. In 1949, Colonial Revival detailing was artfully added to its main facade, enhancing its architectural allure. William Daniell, the visionary behind this timeless structure, laid the foundation for a legacy that endures in the heart of Oconee County.

  • Madison

    With a National Register Historic District renowned for its significant collection of architectural styles spanning the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Madison’s architectural heritage continues to capture the imagination of travelers. Among the small town’s multitude of architectural masterpieces, The Hunter House has been popularly touted as the most photographed home in Georgia. 

    A splendid showcase of the High Victorian style, The Hunter House was crafted in 1885 by John Hudson Hunter as a romantic gesture for his bride. The home still bears the initials “H.H.” within each delicately crafted porch arch. The Victorian charm extends to the intricate “gingerbread” trim adorning the porch, balcony, and interior stair railing—a masterpiece crafted locally at the Atkinson Variety Works. The Hunter House graces the cover of “The Mystery of the Gingerbread House” by Wyle Folk St. John, cementing its place not just in architectural history but also in the whimsical narratives of children’s literature.

    While noticeably most of the surviving houses in the Madison Historic District were built for a white population that flourished alongside the local cotton economy reaching new highs starting in the 1840s, just as integral to understanding the town’s story is viewing the few remaining, modest residences that served as homes to the Black enslaved population and, later, to sharecroppers and tenant farmers. Living quarters for enslaved people would have been located behind some of the older houses in town, of which only a couple still exist as most were likely wooden shacks with dirt floors that were prone to decay. The John Wesley Moore house, now the Morgan County African-American Museum, offers a chance to step into one of the few remaining examples of a tenant farmer’s home. Moore, an African American born in the last years of slavery, lived in the house with his wife and four children. The home features the popular Folk Victorian architectural style but with a Gable-ell design – intersecting gables creating an “L” shape.

  • Athens

    Explore the historic birthplace of public higher education in the United States on the University of Georgia’s North Campus. Dating back to 1801, five years before the city of Athens itself was chartered, this campus is a living testament to the roots of academia. As you stroll through the traditional entrance, marked by the iconic Arch inspired by Georgia’s state seal, you’ll witness the vibrant campus life. Avoiding a walk beneath the Arch is a student tradition, believed to ensure graduation. The Old College building, dating back to 1801, served as the original hub for students and faculty. A Greek Revival masterpiece, the Chapel houses George Cook’s monumental painting of St. Peter’s Cathedral, a significant piece in the university’s rich heritage. Don’t miss the Chapel Bell, rung joyously to celebrate athletic victories and academic milestones. Herty Field, now graced by a fountain, echoes the earliest days of UGA football. Explore this historic campus through guided tours offered by the UGA Visitors Center or embark on a self-guided journey.

    The Taylor-Grady House stands as a Greek Revival architectural masterpiece with a rich historical legacy. Constructed in the 1840s by General Robert Taylor as a family summer home, it later became the collegiate residence of renowned newspaper editor Henry W. Grady. Credited with shaping the perspective of the New South after the Civil War, the Taylor-Grady House is rightfully designated as a National Historic Landmark.

  • Eatonton

    Eatonton boasts two ancient Native American effigies, each offering a glimpse into the cultural richness of the Middle Woodland period. The Rock Hawk Effigy, a striking bird-shaped arrangement of stones spanning approximately 100 feet, served ceremonial and symbolic functions within indigenous communities. Adjacent Rock Hawk Trails provide an immersive experience, blending natural beauty with cultural significance.

    On the other hand, the iconic Rock Eagle Effigy stands as one of the oldest and best-preserved effigy mounds in the Southeastern United States. Created between 1 AD and 1000 AD, it spans approximately 120 feet across, offering valuable insights into prehistoric Native American societies. This effigy serves as a crucial architectural landmark, bridging the past and present, and inviting contemplation and appreciation for the diverse cultural heritage that shaped the region.

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Small Towns, Great Stories

  • Eatonton

    In the heart of Eatonton, a small Southern town embraced by the Georgia landscape, a captivating tale unfolded—a narrative deeply interwoven with the roots of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alice Walker. This enchanting town, where Walker spent her formative years, became the fertile soil from which her literary brilliance blossomed. Born and raised in the tight-knit community, Walker’s journey from these quaint streets to global acclaim is a testament to the extraordinary narratives that emerge from seemingly ordinary places. The echoes of Eatonton resonate in Walker’s words, particularly in her iconic work “The Color Purple,” where she delves deep into the complexities of race, gender, and societal dynamics.

    Venture into Eatonton, and you’ll find yourself stepping into the very scenes that inspired Walker’s literary masterpieces. The Alice Walker Driving Tour offers a curated journey through the pivotal locations of her upbringing—a literary pilgrimage that reveals the profound influence of small-town life. From the home where she first put pen to paper to the familiar places that sparked her imagination, every corner of Eatonton whispers the story of Walker’s transformative journey. In these small towns, great stories emerge, leaving an enduring legacy that transcends both time and place.

  • Entrance to Andrews Family Legacy exhibit at Madison-Morgan Cultural Center

    Madison

    Madison unveils a collection of captivating stories that enrich its unique character, beginning with the Andrews family’s legacy. Originating as sharecroppers in the heart of the South, the Andrews family cultivated more than crops—they nurtured a lineage of writers, artists, and civic leaders. Their collective work serves as a poignant chronicle of navigating life as Black individuals in the rural, segregated South. Through their art, the Andrews family transcended the confines of Morgan County, leaving a lasting mark on culture and society. Today, at the Madison-Morgan Cultural Center, visitors can immerse themselves in the authentic narratives of the Andrews family, as the exhibition “The Andrews Family Legacy: Rooted in the Agriculture and Arts of Morgan County” unveils the compelling intersection of rural life and artistic expression that defines this extraordinary family’s story.

    “The House that Changed a Georgia Law,” the 1850 Nathan Bennett House in Madison, stands as a testament to a pivotal moment in history. Inherited by Amanda Cardwell from her father, the house faced an unexpected turn of events when, in 1863, her husband, Junius Smith, lost it in a poker game to James Mann. As Mann sought to claim his winnings, a legal battle ensued, eventually reaching the Georgia Legislature. The outcome was the passage of the Married Women’s Property Act in 1869, a groundbreaking decision allowing married women to inherit property separately. While the law came too late to save Amanda’s home, it marked a significant milestone for Southern women’s rights. Today, the Nathan Bennett House, recognized on the National Register of Historic Places, stands as a living monument to the enduring impact of this landmark legal case.

    Madison also boasts the tale of local legend of Joshua Hill, a congressman whose pivotal role during Sherman’s “March to the Sea” is said to have preserved the town from devastation. A staunch Unionist, Hill, despite his son’s Confederate service, negotiated with General Sherman to spare Madison during the destructive march in 1864. His plea to spare civilian structures ensured that most homes and businesses escaped the ravages of war. As Reconstruction unfolded, Hill’s political journey continued, making him Georgia’s first Republican Senator in 1871, leaving an enduring mark on Madison’s history.

  • Macon

    The Grand Opera House unfolds tales of greatness, where historic echoes resonate with performances by luminaries like Broadway’s icons Lillian Russell and Maude Adams (Broadway’s original Peter Pan). It bears witness to the mystifying illusions of Harry Houdini, who cut nine doors into the Grand’s stage for his illusions, one of which has been preserved. The grand stage also hosted the grace of Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova and became a vibrant space during the Southern Rock explosion, featuring legendary bands like The Allman Brothers and Marshall Tucker Band. Today, the Grand Opera House stands proudly as the home of the Macon-Mercer Symphony Orchestra, where it continues to weave captivating stories with nationally touring Broadway productions and an array of live musical and theatrical performances.

    The story of Otis Redding is a story of love for a city and community that has transcended generations – interlaced with Macon’s music heritage. The King of Soul arrived in Macon at two and he would go on to meet Macon native, Little Richard, in his teen years and join the Pinetoppers band in 1958 with Johnny Jenkins, another Macon native. Recording hits like “These Arms of Mine,” Otis not only left a lasting imprint on music but his legacy also lives on through the Otis Redding Foundation, impacting youth with musical education and a mini museum on Cotton Avenue showcasing rare memorabilia. Learn more about Otis and Macon’s other music legends via the Macon Music Trail on the Tour Macon mobile app.

  • Athens

    In 1891, Athens proudly became home to the inaugural garden club in America, a testament to its enduring commitment to horticulture. Fast forward to the 1930s, and the collaborative efforts of the Garden Club of Georgia and the University of Georgia landscape architecture department brought forth a captivating tribute – the Founders Memorial Garden. Sprawling across 2.5 acres, this verdant sanctuary showcases over 300 species, including historic trees, shrubs, and perennials. Adorned with a formal boxwood garden, two courtyards, a terrace, a sunken perennial garden, and an informal arboretum surrounding a historic residence, kitchen building, and smokehouse, the garden radiates tranquility. At its heart stands the Lumpkin House, an iconic rose-brick Greek Revival-style structure, originally erected in 1857. Serving as an active hub within the Founders Memorial Garden, the Lumpkin House, the first recorded address on Lumpkin Street, adds historical depth to the landscape. Recognized on both the National and Georgia Registers of Historic Places, this garden earned its place among the top 100 “landscapes of significance” in the United States, as acknowledged by the American Society of Landscape Architects in 1999.

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A group of four people, two women and two men, are sitting around a wooden table outdoors, enjoying a meal. They are raising their drinks in a toast and smiling. Plates of food and glasses of water are on the table, with a colorful mural in the background—an ideal scene for any dining guide on where to dine.

Where to Dine

  • Macon

    Macon, Georgia, is steeped in musical history, and its culinary scene is no exception. Three standout restaurants along Georgia’s Trail of Legacy and Lore in Macon are H&H Restaurant, Downtown Grill, and Rookery.

    Established in 1959 by Inez Hill and Louise Hudson, H&H Restaurant isn’t just a place to savor soulful Southern cuisine; it’s a living testament to Macon’s musical legacy.  The enduring friendship between Mama Louise and the Allman Brothers Band is etched into the restaurant’s history. After feeding the Allman Brothers when they couldn’t afford food otherwise, Mama Louise had a dedicated seat on the band’s tour bus and a lifelong connection with Gregg and the band members. Today, H&H remains a pilgrimage site for music historians and enthusiasts. And the food? Well… it’s just good for the soul.

    Downtown Grill in Macon is more than just an acclaimed steakhouse; it’s a place where culinary excellence meets musical history. Formerly known as Le Bistro, this restaurant witnessed the iconic proposal of Gregg Allman to Cher in 1973, commemorated by a plaque on its exterior. As part of the Macon Music Historic Registry, it’s a culinary haven where love stories and delectable menus intersect. Over the years many more prominent public figures have dined here such as Jimmy Carter and Andy Warhol.

    A staple restaurant of downtown Macon since 1976, the Rookery has hosted countless live music performances. Most notably, Rickie Lee Jones and Tom Waits performed here in the 1970s, and Widespread Panic played here in 1986. Today, it is remembered as the birthplace of Bragg Jam, Macon’s premier summer music festival that honors the memory of musician brothers Brax and Tate Bragg. Known for their burgers and milkshakes, all given names to reflect Macon’s music ties and celebrities that have enjoyed the signature eatery.

  • Athens

    The legacy of Last Resort in Athens stretches back to its roots as a music club in 1966, where the melodies of passionate performers like Reverend Pearly Brown, Towns Van Zandt, Doc Watson, Jimmy Buffett, and even Steve Martin echoed through its walls. Today, the same fervor has found a new home in Last Resort’s menu and atmosphere, weaving together the threads of its eclectic history. 

    Five & Ten in Athens is a culinary and architectural masterpiece that beckons both food enthusiasts and admirers of historic charm. Chef/Owner Hugh Acheson, a James Beard Award winner, has crafted a menu that showcases Southern cuisine with a modern twist. Housed in the historic Hawthorne House, a creation of architect Fred Orr in the early twentieth century, Five & Ten offers a dining experience that seamlessly blends culinary excellence and architectural elegance. The original structure remains mostly untouched, preserving its authentic charm, while subtle modern additions, like a kitchen extension, enhance the overall ambiance. With multiple dining rooms, a spacious bar, a coffee bar, and a welcoming patio, Five & Ten invites you to savor a unique fusion of culinary and architectural brilliance.

  • Madison

    A staple of Southern culture, Soul Food was born from the ingenuity of enslaved individuals who transformed humble ingredients into flavorful masterpieces. This cuisine has evolved into today’s beloved dishes such as collard greens with cornbread, mac ‘n cheese, and Southern fried delights. To enjoy an authentic taste of Soul Food, a visit to one of Madison’s Black-owned restaurants offering meat and three plus sweet tea is a must. Local favorites include Benny Paul’s Soul Food and Martha’s Favorites, while just outside of Madison, in the historically Black Canaan District, R+B Café is another popular spot serving up Southern-style home cooking rooted in Georgia’s culinary traditions.

    For diners with a taste for the elevated dishes of the New South, The Dining Room offers a chef-driven fine dining experience rooted in farm-to-table principles. Dinner service is always a unique experience, as Executive Chef Russell Hays crafts a custom, multi-course prix fixe menu that changes weekly based on the freshest available ingredients. Enhance the dining experience with custom wine pairings, expertly curated to complement each course of the prix fixe menu.

  • Oconee County

    After exploring Oconee County’s trail segment, treat yourself at Chops and Hops, a local favorite since 2010. With mouth-watering bites, refreshing cocktails, and a commitment to using locally sourced, seasonal ingredients, this unique dining experience ensures a memorable visit. The chefs pride themselves on creating flavorful dishes, and the restaurant is deeply connected to the community. Whether you dine in or opt for catering, Chops and Hops provides versatile options, including to-go services, reservations, and private dining for larger groups.

    For authentic Mexican flavors, check out Kique’s Kitchen, where authentic Mexican flavors await. Embracing the essence of Mexico’s culinary traditions, Kique’s Kitchen is a haven for those seeking an authentic and vibrant dining experience. With a dedication to fresh, high-quality ingredients, every dish tells a story of cultural richness and culinary excellence. From vibrant spices to carefully selected fruits and vegetables, each element is chosen with care to transport you to the heart of Mexico. The passionate team of chefs at Kique’s Kitchen brings these traditions to life, infusing love into every dish and creating an unforgettable taste of Mexico right in Oconee County.

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